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Islington A-level results among country’s worst

Town Hall education chief defends ‘diligent’ students as borough is rated among worst-performing areas in the country

08 February, 2019 — By Emily Finch

Education chief Councillor Joe Caluori: ‘Students in Islington are some of the most diligent and hardest-working young people in the country, and we are immensely proud of them’

ISLINGTON was rated one of the worst performing boroughs in the country for A-level results last year.

The Department for Educat­ion released its provisional results for 2018 this week, with Islington ranked below the national average.

But the Town Hall has argued that the government figures fail to “paint a complete picture of educational outcomes” because they do not include all schools, or students in Islington. Just 2.5 per cent of students took home a combination of three A*s or As at A-level – the grades usually needed for entry to Oxbridge or highly competitive courses. This fell well below the inner London average of 10 per cent.

Just 6.8 per cent of sixth-formers received AAB grades or above, compared with 20 per cent of schoolchildren in neighbouring Haringey.

The government uses an “average point system” to determine the results table for A-levels, which rated Islington as “D+” overall.

The Town Hall stressed how the figures do not take into account A-level results for City and Islington College, based in Angel, and other sixth-form conglomerates counted under Camden’s results.

In Islington, seven out of 10 secondary schools are rated “outstanding” by Ofsted – the highest possible ranking.

Education chief Councillor Joe Caluori said: “Students in Islington are some of the most diligent and hardest-working young people in the country, and we are immensely proud of them.

“This government data doesn’t paint a complete picture of educational outcomes in Islington because it doesn’t include all schools, or students in Islington.

“It’s important to recognise that many students chose to pursue equally valid routes into university or employment. A-levels followed by a Russell Group university is right for some young people, but should not be seen as the be all and end all.

“Many students who live in the borough are doing exceptionally well, despite the significant disadvantages faced by many young people in Islington.”

He added: “The council is working hard with young people and schools to tackle the challenges facing students and their families, such as inequality and deprivation.

“It is vitally important we do not diminish the achievements of our young people by focusing on a single, highly selective and misleading benchmark for success.”

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