IslingtonTribune

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Mum of man found dead in Holloway bin: ‘He was the light in my world’

Woman tells of her pain after 23-year-old was found dumped outside abandoned house

18 October, 2019 — By Calum Fraser

Erik San-Filippo’s body was discovered in Tollington Road earlier this year

THE mother of an Italian man who was found dead in a bin has told how her boy was “like the sun” and brought light into her world.

Carmen De Caro spoke to the Tribune as a man pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice in connection to the case.

Her son, Erik San-Filippo, 23, was found dumped in a bin outside of an abandoned house in Tollington Road, Holloway, earlier this year.

Ms De Caro, speaking with the help of translator, said that when her son came to London a year before his death, it was the first time he had left home.

The derelict house in Tollington Road

She added that she was in “a lot of pain” and that she intended to come to London for an inquest that will be held into his death next month.

Gerardo Rossi, 52, of Tollington Road, pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice at Snaresbrook Crown Court on Friday. He will be sentenced next month.

A post-mortem in July found that Mr San-­Filippo died of a drug overdose.

Ms De Caro said: “I am in a lot of pain. They have taken away the sun from me because my son was the light in my world. He had been in London for a year and it was the first time he had left Italy and his family. He was my only son.”

The family is from a village called Marti in Tuscany, northern Italy.

The derelict house in Tollington Road

Ms De Caro added: “I am too emotional. I will say only that my son was a very special person, he was like the sun, he was hard-working, happy and kind.”

When Mr San-Filippo arrived in London, he went to work in a food stall in Camden Market where fellow traders spoke of their grief of losing a friend.

“When I heard he was dead I had to take two days off. He was my best friend here in the market,” one colleague told the Tribune. “We worked shoulder to shoulder for months. He was very funny. He wasn’t great at English, but he would use a lot of body language. He’d use his face and his hands, Italian-style.”

A second charge of preventing a lawful burial against Mr Rossi is expected to be kept on file.

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