IslingtonTribune

The independent London newspaper

‘Use tech to keep Highbury moving’

Residents and businesses tell of concern over impact of the Town Hall’s ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ restrictions

11 December, 2020 — By Helen Chapman

The Keep Highbury Moving group share concerns about road closures

RESIDENTS and businesses are calling on the council to use cameras and technology to allow some vehicles to pass through traffic blocks in Highbury.

Islington began work on its Low Traffic Neighbourhood bollards in Avenell Road and Plimsoll Road last week.

But Sarah Georgiou from Mrs Lovell’s Greengrocers in Highbury Park said: “We rely on our locals and we rely on people that pass by. If you can’t park around the corner are you going to come to us or are you going to go to a supermarket with a car park?

“Over the lockdown we delivered to our customers who couldn’t come to us, such as those who are disabled. It is essential things that we are having to do here.”

James Godfreys, from Godfreys butcher shop in Highbury Park, said he was concerned about business deliveries, adding: “Our suppliers are driving to us and it’s going to take longer for them. They’re going to have to sit in traffic, driving emissions up.”

Sarah Georgiou and James Godfrey

Six camera-enforced traffic filters will be installed in Aubert Park, Benwell Road, Gillespie Road, Highbury Hill, Monsell Road and St Thomas’s Road.

Joanna Sargent, a resident and spokesperson for the Keep Highbury Moving group, said they support the council in their desire to reduce out-of-borough rat-runners but are concerned about the impact of road restrictions on local residents.

“We are urging the council to allow locals to move around their area using ANPR technology and to keep Highbury moving.”

Cabinet member for the environment councillor Rowena Champion said: “All homes and businesses in Islington can still be accessed by car. We carefully consider all feedback received and, where necessary, have made and will continue to make changes to improve accessibility in individual people-friendly streets neighbourhoods.

“People-friendly streets will also bring benefits for some disabled people, including making it easier to use their local streets because of reduced traffic danger, pollution and noise.”

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