IslingtonTribune

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‘Very difficult life’ of drug overdose victim

Young father’s body found after he left crisis centre

11 August, 2017 — By Emily Finch

A YOUNG father who was sexually abused as a teenager and had started drinking at the age of eight died from a drug overdose at his friend’s home in Canonbury, an inquest has heard.

Keith Jackson, 24, who suffered from mental health issues and drug addiction, was found dead by the friend at the flat in Clephane Road in the morning of March 17.

A St Pancras Coroner’s Court inquest on Monday heard that the father-of-two had been reported missing the night before by staff at Highbury Grove Crisis Centre, which supports people with drug and mental health issues.

He had left the centre with a female friend.

Mr Jackson had been staying at the centre after threatening to jump off a balcony and badly scratching his face earlier that month, the inquest heard.

Police were called to Clephane Road just before 8am the day after he left the crisis centre after it received a phone call from his friend, who was unable to wake him.

A post-mortem examination found he had a lethal mix of heroin, cocaine and alcohol in his blood when he died.

In a written statement, his friend, Mary Audrey, said she phoned the crisis centre after finding Mr Jackson unresponsive. When paramedics arrived he was already dead.

A psychologist’s report read out at the hearing detailed Mr Jackson’s childhood in North Wales, where he started drinking at the age of eight. It was stated he was abused as a teenager.

The inquest heard how Mr Jackson was abandoned by his mother on multiple occasions and as a 14-year-old witnessed his uncle commit suicide.

In his late teens he moved to Birmingham and Manchester, where he became addicted to can­nabis and alcohol. He had recently split from his girlfriend of two years.

Assistant coroner Dr William Dolman said: “This is a sad story of a man with a troubled childhood with a very difficult life with lots of problems.”

Dr Dolman ruled that the death was “drug related” with a secondary cause of epilepsy.

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